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Gwich'in People

Category: People
Sub Category:Inuit of Canada
Location:Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada
Summary Information:
The Gwich'in live at the northern edge of Canada's boreal forest, making them one of the most northerly Aboriginal people of North America. Their traditional lands extend from the headwaters of the Peel and Arctic Red Rivers upwards to the Mackenzie Delta, and stretch from the Anderson River across to the Richardson Mountains. This rich environment provides for hunting, fishing and trapping which are important economic and cultural activities for the Gwich'in.

The Gwich'in are members of the Athaspaskans people, which includes the Slavey, Dogrib, Han and Tutchone people. The Gwich'in possess a distinct language and way of life. The Gwich'in now live primarily in the communities of Fort McPherson, Tsiigehtichic, Aklavik and Inuvik where their population stands at approximately 2,500 people. Gwich'in from Alaska and Yukon brings the total population to about 5,000 people.

Related Entries

Agreement
  • Dogrib Comprehensive Land Claim and Self-Government Agreement-in-Principle
  • Gwich'in Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement
  • Gwich'in and Inuvialuit Self-Government Agreement-In-Principle for the Beaufort-Delta Region
  • Yukon Transboundary Agreement
  • Gwich'in Self-Government Framework Agreement
  • Beaufort-Delta Political Accord
  • Organisation
  • Gwich'in Tribal Council
  • Deline Dene Band
  • Aboriginal Summit
  • Assembly of First Nations
  • Legislation
  • Gwich'in Land Claim Settlement Act
  • People
  • Dogrib First Nation People
  • Inuvialuit People
  • Sahtu Dene People
  • Metis People

  • References

    Resource
    Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (1992) Implementation Plan for the Gwich'in Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement 2003
    Gwich'in Social and Cultural Institute 'The Gwich'in'

    Glossary

    Inuit of Canada

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