Back to search results

printable versionPrint this page

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park Plan of Management

Category: Event
Date: 1 January 2000
Sub Category:Plan of Management
Location:Uluru - Katja Tjuta National Park, Northern Territory, Australia
The Park consists of the Uluru-Katatjuta Aboriginal Land Trust Aboriginal freehold land. It covers an area of approximately 1325 square kms, 500 kms to the south-west of Alice Springs.
Subject Matter:Collaboration / Partnership | Cultural Heritage | Environmental Heritage | Land Management
Summary Information:
The present Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park Plan of Management is the fourth such plan for the Park and was prepared by the Uluru - Kata Tjuta Board of Management and the Director of National Parks and Wildlife, in accordance with the provisions of the National Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act 1975 under which the Park was established. The National Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act has now been replaced by the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

The Park is jointly managed between Anangu and the Commonwealth. The word Anangu is interpreted in the Plan of Management to mean 'Western Desert Aboriginal person or people (generally those Aboriginal people with traditional affiliations to the Park)'.

On the 26th October 1985 title to the Park was formally granted to the Uluru-Katatjuta Aboriginal Land Trust who immediately leased the area back to the Director of National Parks and Wildlife, to be managed under a Board of Management with an Anangu majority. Joint management of the Park has been operating since 10 December 1985 when the first Board of Management was established.
Detailed Information:
The Board consists of six Aboriginal people nominated by traditional owners, the Director of National Parks and Wildlife, a representative of the Minister for the Environment, a representative of the Minister for Tourism, and a scientist experienced in arid land ecology and management. The functions of the Board are: to prepare the Plan of Management for the Park; to make decisions about the management of the Park that are consistent with the Plan of Management; to monitor the management of the Park; and to advise the Minister on the future development of the Park.

The intention to prepare the present, and fourth, Plan of Management was announced in 1996.

The fundamental value guiding management of the Park is the Tjukurpa. According to the Plan of Management, Tjukurpa is 'the Pitjantjatjara word for law: history, knowledge, religion and morality that forms the basis of Anangu values and how Anangu conduct their lives and look after their country, plan, story, message.' Looking after the country in accordance with Tjukurpa is the prime responsibility of joint management. The Plan of Management states that Pitjantjatjara is 'a widely spoken Aboriginal dialect belonging to the language group linguists call the Western Desert language'.

The Plan of Management covers major issues such as:

  • cultural heritage and natural resource management - this includes the maintenance of traditional ceremonial activities; protection of sacred sites and places of cultural significance; water and fire management; protection of native flora and fauna and pest control (both plant and animal); mining; and research and monitoring.
  • visitors to the Park - this includes access to and use of the Park; information, education and interpretation; safety and comfort; and commercial tourist enterprises.
  • the Mutitjulu Community - this community lies within the park and has a population of approximately 400 people and requires services, infrastructure and maintenance.
  • administrative matters - such as employment, education and training of staff; law enforcement; and financial affairs.

    In addition to its obligations under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act, the Board has international obligations arising out of the Park's listing in 1994 as a World Heritage Area, on account of both its natural and cultural values, under the Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage (1975).

    In 1995 Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park won the Picasso Gold Medal, the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation's highest award for outstanding efforts to preserve the landscape and Anangu culture and for setting new international standards for World Heritage management.

  • Related Entries

    Agreement
  • Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park Memorandum of Lease
  • Organisation
  • Uluru - Kata Tjuta Aboriginal Land Trust
  • Director of National Parks and Wildlife
  • Event
  • Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage
  • Legislation
  • National Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act 1975 (Cth)
  • Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth)
  • People
  • Pitjantjatjara People
  • Place
  • Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park

  • References

    Book
    Uluru - Kata Tjuta Board of Management and Parks Australia (2000) Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park Plan of Management
    Resource
    Department of the Environment and Heritage (2000) Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park Plan of Management

    Google
    Top of page

    Was this useful? Click here to fill in the ATNS survey